Wolves To Help Ikeme Battle Against Leukaemia

Ikeme

.Read causes of leukemia and how it happens in the body under this story –

Wolves goalkeeper Carl Ikeme, who was diagnosed with acute leukaemia would not be alone in the struggle as his club has rallied round the Nigerian shot stopper.

The 31-year-old Nigeria international returned abnormal blood tests during pre-season testing, and further tests revealed he is suffering from leukaemia.

Ikeme will now start an immediate course of chemotherapy as he begins a lengthy battle against the disease.

“It would be an understatement to say that everyone at Wolves has been shocked and saddened to hear the news of Carl’s diagnosis,” said Wolves’ managing director Laurie Dalrymple.

“That relates to both players and staff as Carl has been at the club for a very long time and remains such an integral personality within the group.

“At the same time, we all know what a fighter and a competitor Carl is, and I have no doubt that he will take all of those attributes into this battle.

“Similarly, its goes without saying that Carl and his family will receive the full love and support that we at Wolves can provide – we are all with him every single step of the way towards a full recovery.

“There are going to be some very tough times ahead, but he will receive the best possible care, aided and supported by our own club doctor and medical team, as he embarks on the lengthy process of treatment.

What Is Leukemia?
Leukemia is usually thought of as a children’s condition, but it actually affects more adults. It’s more common in men than women, and more in Caucasians than African-Americans.

There’s really nothing you can do to prevent leukemia. It’s cancer of your blood cells caused by a rise in the number of white blood cells in your body. They crowd out the red blood cells and platelets your body needs to be healthy. All those extra white blood cells don’t work right, and that causes problems.

How Does It Happen?

Blood has three types of cells: white blood cells that fight infection, red blood cells that carry oxygen, and platelets that help blood to clot.

Every day, billions of new blood cells are produced in the bone marrow — most of them red cells. But when you have leukemia, your body makes more white cells than it needs.

There are two main types of white blood cells in your body: lymphoid cells and myeloid cells. Leukemia can happen in either type.

These leukemia cells can’t fight infection the way normal white blood cells do. And because there are so many of them, they start to affect the way your major organs function. Eventually, there aren’t enough red blood cells to supply oxygen, enough platelets to clot the blood, or enough normal white blood cells to fight infection.

Along with infection, this can cause problems like anemia, bruising, and bleeding.


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